Now here’s a move that makes sense: the Episcopal Church and the Evangelical [sic] Lutheran Church in America are going to start sharing Washington lobbying resources. According to the Episcopal News Service:

Sarah Kristin Dreier began July 5 in her new role as the legislative representative for international issues for both the Episcopal Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America in an effort by both denominations to share resources.

“The appointment of Sarah Dreier to jointly serve the advocacy offices of the Episcopal Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America marks an important ecumenical milestone in the life of full communion between the two churches,” said Alexander D. Baumgarten, the Episcopal Church’s director of government relations, according to a press release. “Common mission has always been the aim of full communion, and the joint appointment of a staff person will strengthen each church by allowing it to share the perspectives and gifts of the other church more concretely in our witness in Washington.”

“Joint appointment…will strengthen each church by allowing it to share the perspectives and gifts of the other church…” This sentence sort of implies that the Episcopalians and Lutherans have different perspectives to share, doesn’t it? In fact, the two denominations, along with the UCC, PCUSA, Disciples of Christ, and United Methodist General Board of Church and Society are in total lockstep with regard to their Washington lobbying. There are no issues on which these denominations’ various Washington agencies disagree as far as I know, just as there is no disagreement of which I’m aware between these agencies and the Democratic Party. It would make even more sense for them to simply combine all of their various agencies into one big LibProt Lobbying Group. Then, they could square the circle by becoming a wholly owned subsidiary of the Democratic National Committee.

Dreier, by the way, is the perfect person to do this:

Dreier has worked for the Center for American Progress in Washington D.C., the American Bar Foundation and the ELCA churchwide office, both in Chicago. The Christian Science Monitor is among the publications that have published her works.

Of course she’s worked for a left-wing, partisan-in-everything-but-name think tank. They wouldn’t have considered her if she hadn’t.

(Via the Religion New Service blog.)